ModernityBlog

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Racism In The UK.

with 4 comments

The European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI) has just released a report on racism in the United Kingdom.

There have been four such reports since 1999 and they can be found here, in English and French.

Briefly scanning the report I noticed a few issues, particularly concerning blacks in Britain, the Roma, refugees and how many Muslims feel stigmatised in the current political climate:

“While progress has been made towards eliminating discrimination, many inequalities remain. Black children are still around twice as likely as others to be permanently excluded from school, and outcomes in the field of de facto ethnic and religious segregation in schools also do not seem to have improved significantly. Not enough has been done to eliminate prejudices and discrimination occurring in the workplace, for example against Muslims; Black and minority ethnic groups are also under­represented across the public sector. In parallel, discrimination law has become more complex, meaning victims need legal assistance in this field. Some ethnic minorities continue to face specific health problems, and their health in general is vulnerable to conditions of social and economic disadvantage. Ethnic minorities continue to be over­represented in the prison population, and their proportion continues to rise.

Gypsies and Travellers are still among the most disadvantaged minority ethnic groups in the United Kingdom and the most likely to face discrimination in all fields of daily life, and they face some of the most severe levels of hostility and prejudice. Much more still needs to be done to redress the situation. Adequate site provision, which is frequently at the crux of escalating community tensions, remains an especially pressing issue.

Refugees and asylum seekers also remain vulnerable in the United Kingdom to destitution, wrong decisions and wrongful detention, and the tone of public discourse remains frequently hostile towards them. At the same time, measures put forward by the authorities as part of proposals to consolidate immigration legislation foreshadow generally more restrictive policies in this field, and hostility towards migrant workers appears to be increasing.

Anti­terror provisions also continue to cause concern. Stops and searches under anti­terror legislation disproportionately affect members of Black and minority ethnic communities. Research has shown that Muslims feel stigmatised and alienated by these measures, and young Muslims who have been regularly stopped and searched feel increasingly marginalised. Black men are also around four times more likely than White men to be included in the national DNA database. Overall, Black and minority ethnic people are more likely to be imprisoned than White people, and more likely than White people to die in prison. “

I think the ECRI’s report paints an accurate picture as far as I can make out. I will come back to it later, time permitting.

Update 1: The ECRI discusses the Crown Prosecution Service’s annual report on hate crime.

Unfortunately it’s not very easy to find nor is the latest report terribly lucid, it doesn’t tell you anything significantly worthwhile. I was hoping for a breakdown on racial offences in Britain, etc but the best I could find was that some “75% of hate crime defendants were identified as belonging to the White British category, and 79% were categorised as White.”. That’s about it.

4 Responses

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  1. This journal article is several years old, but still makes for interesting (and relevant) reading: An examination of how the British press violates its own ethical codes in the way it covers Gypsies and Travellers:

    http://www.law.cf.ac.uk/tlru/Tolleys.pdf

    Judeosphere

    04/03/2010 at 01:21

  2. Maybe its an American thing, but I was taught that the proper term was Roma and that Gypsy was highly offensive.

    Then again, the term Paki draws different reactions from the Pakistan diaspora in the United States and Pakistan emigres in Britain, so maybe varies by country.

    History Punk

    04/03/2010 at 03:32

  3. HP,

    You’re right, I have made that mistake myself, this stuff is coming from the EU, so you’d hope they’d know better?

    modernity

    04/03/2010 at 12:57

  4. […] is not new, as I pointed out before, but the actions in France have allowed xenophobia into the open and the Jobbik fully intend […]


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