ModernityBlog

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” Abraham Lincoln

Interpol’s Most Wanted.

with 16 comments

If you take a look at Interpol’s website, amongst the most wanted you will find an entry for ASSANGE, Julian Paul.

That to me is strange.

Sexual assault, if that actually happened, is very serious, but to be put on Interpol’s most wanted list is another matter and it all strikes me as politically motivated.

Wikileaks made dozens, if not hundreds of politicians, look stupid.

It annoyed political rulers from America to Iran and most states in between. It confirmed our suspicions on how the world’s rulers act, capriciously, with stupidity, and much worse, and that is what is really behind Julian Assange’s arrest.

The worrying thing is, given the inflammatory statements from American politicians calling for his assassination, you could imagine that he might as the British police used to say “slip while walking into the cells”.

I wouldn’t put it past politicians to arrange his liquidation in the hopes of neutering Wikileaks.

On the other hand, apparently there is an encrypted file hanging around the web waiting to be released should that happen, a form of insurance policy. A smart move.

I imagine that once Julian Assange is in custody that the charges in Sweden will be dropped and other ones from the US instigated, with his deportation to America happening in short order.

I wonder if he’ll end up in a new Gitmo. Whatever happens it doesn’t bode well for him.

16 Responses

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  1. Rather hypocritical what about when Condoleeza Rice when she confirmed we had a mole in Bid Liden’s outfit? Or when Senator Richard Shelby publically stated we were listening to all of Bid Laden’s communciations or when somebody in the Bush Administration outed Valerie Plame?

    Andrew Murphy

    06/12/2010 at 23:23

  2. Indeed, there is a lot of hypocrisy over the leak.

    I think it hurts the ego of politicians more than anything else and that’s why Assange is a wanted man.

    modernityblog

    07/12/2010 at 00:01

  3. It is SOOOOO over the top. I simply cannot recognize my country any more. I have felt shame for the bogus attack on Iraq, the entire Bush Administration, and now this.

    It weighs so heavily on my soul.

    prantha

    07/12/2010 at 00:33

  4. I disagree, gentlemen. I’ll leave you with recent remarks by Christopher Hitchens to mull over.

    “The moral “other half” of civil disobedience, as its historic heroes show, is that you stoically accept the consequences that come with it.”

    “…And that, of course, prosecution or no prosecution, is what he really ought to do. If I had decided to shame the British authorities on Iraq in 1976, [ ed. note – Hitchens is referring to his actions during his own ‘Wikileaks’ moment, when he came across a classified British diplomatic memo approving of Saddam Hussein coup in Iraq] I would have accepted the challenge to see them in court or otherwise face the consequences. I couldn’t have expected to help myself to secret documents, make myself a private arbiter of foreign policy, and disappear or retire on the proceeds. All you need to know about Assange is contained in the profile of him by the great John F. Burns and in his shockingly thuggish response to it. The man is plainly a micro-megalomaniac with few if any scruples and an undisguised agenda. As I wrote before, when he says that his aim is “to end two wars,” one knows at once what he means by the “ending.” In his fantasies he is probably some kind of guerrilla warrior, but in the real world he is a middle man and peddler who resents the civilization that nurtured him.”

    Adam Levick

    07/12/2010 at 00:36

  5. I don’t see why everyone’s so upset? Did he blow the cover of Joe Wilson’s wife? No, he did not.

    mesquito

    07/12/2010 at 01:22

  6. Exactly Mesq.

    He’s let into the public domain information which we should already have known.

    There is much talk of transparency in government, but once it happens, as with these leaks, politicians and bureaucrats throw a fit.

    modernityblog

    07/12/2010 at 01:25

  7. I came across this cable after it had been declassified a few years ago,
    Hitchens is referring to his actions during his own ‘Wikileaks’ moment, when he came across a classified British diplomatic memo.

    Get your facts straight.

    Generally good post, if sitting on the fence a little.

    skidmarx

    07/12/2010 at 13:34

  8. There’s NO fencing sitting at my end.

    1) I am pro wikileaks and have posted on them for ages.

    2) I think that it is good for such info to be in the public domain

    3) I worry that Assange will be killed.

    Pray tell, AFTER you’ve made an effort to read all of my previous posts, where the supposed fence sitting is….

    modernity

    07/12/2010 at 14:10

  9. Hey Mod, you’re to be commended on the clarity of your position, but are you really saying that folks who steal or reveal state secrets shouldn’t rightly be held legally accountable for their crimes? I guess, more broadly, don’t, in your mind, nations have the right to maintain such secrecy – though, naturally, its up to each individual country, through citizens’ elected representatives, to determine the degree of transparency and secrecy.

    Adam Levick

    07/12/2010 at 15:01

  10. Adam,

    I have written very extensively on this, and I hope to write more, but as a direct answer to your question.

    No, I don’t believe nation states have a **right** to maintain their secrecy.

    Naturally they *do* but I realistic enough to appreciate that but no it’s not quite the right to freedom of speech or access to drinking water, I don’t consider it an intrinsic right.

    I think Wikileaks has done a great service by showing us how incompetent, feckless and useless most of these leaders of nation states are.

    But to maintain their power they need secrecy they need to hide their incompetence, their morally reprehensible conduct and that’s why Wikileaks is being attacked.

    To preempt your possible reply, I don’t believe that the existing bunch of chancers that run many countries were doing a very good job. I think that more not less scrutiny is important on leaders, that applies historically and to the current crop.

    Wikileaks has been attacked by some of the most disreputable countries in the world, and I can’t help thinking that they must be doing something right, if they annoy so many bullies, murderers and dictators.

    modernityblog

    07/12/2010 at 15:28

  11. No you’re right, I must have mis-read you and apologise.

    skidmarx

    07/12/2010 at 17:48

  12. Skidmarx, I appreciate that.

    I can be accused of many things, but equivocation probably isn’t one of them🙂

    modernityblog

    07/12/2010 at 17:57

  13. Wikileaks has been attacked by some of the most disreputable countries in the world, and I can’t help thinking that they must be doing something right, if they annoy so many bullies, murderers and dictators.

    Those ‘disreputable countries’ are not the target of Assange. The United States and those involved in protecting democracy from rabid Islamism are his targets. Assange is in league with the disappointed Trots at the Guardian. This in itself is enough to condemn him.

    Clap Hammer

    07/12/2010 at 18:09

  14. In league with Trots…..ha ha that’s very funny.

    I hear some think he’s an agent of Mossad and even a possible Satan…..so Trots would be an improvement?

    modernityblog

    07/12/2010 at 18:18

  15. Mod, re:

    “No, I don’t believe nation states have a **right** to maintain their secrecy.

    Naturally they *do* but I realistic enough to appreciate that but no it’s not quite the right to freedom of speech or access to drinking water, I don’t consider it an intrinsic right.”

    Please clarify. Sincerely, I don’t understand your reply to my question – at least as articulated in these passages. In a democratic country where politicians are legitimately elected, do you agree that the only legitimate way to change secrecy laws that you think aren’t necessary is by voting against those who disagree with you and attempting to elect into office those who support a more transparent system? I mean, what does “he rule of law” mean to you?

    Adam Levick

    08/12/2010 at 03:05

  16. Adam,

    Sorry, it was not one of my most articulate moments.

    What I mean is, I believe in rights apply to individuals, not nation states.

    Equally, I appreciate that powerful states will do basically what they can, and individuals have little say in it, and that’s why I support Wikileaks.

    I think as individuals we need to know more, we need to scrutinise governments, we need to really know what’s going on, and not the half-arse lying smiles that we are told.

    You might be surprised, but I don’t have a lot of time for governments, politicians or rules that keep them in power.

    I think social democracy as we have it is better than nothing, but transparency would be a great improvement.

    Politicians don’t like scrutiny, as the expenses scandal at Westminster proved, they were completely in the wrong, it was provable that they were in the wrong, and yet they contended they were right.

    So that the lesson on how politicians see themselves, as a form of entitlement and above the rest of us, and only by scrutiny, transparency and press can such behaviour be changed.

    PS: Just before you ask I don’t have much time for political leaders of ANY shade, that includes the Left, who in my experience, are often self-serving useless individuals, although I freely acknowledged the odd exception.

    modernityblog

    08/12/2010 at 03:41


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